Book Notes
          

Index: 2018 - 2017 - 2016 20152014- 2013
2012 2011 - 2010 - 2009 - 2008 
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The Good Glow: Charity and the Symbolic Power of Doing Good
by Jon Dean

Launch Discount: only £15 with code DTGG20 when ordered from Policy Press until June 3rd: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/the-good-glow

Ahead of the book’s official release tomorrow, list members can order the book for £15 (a 40% discount), by using the code DTGG20 when ordering from the Policy Press website (+ p&p): https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/the-good-glow. This offer is available until June 3rd.

“A hugely relevant and important book for how we understand the institution of charity and how it mobilises and utilises symbolic power. A must read for all scholars of charity.” Eddy Hogg, University of Kent

“This is an engaging, must-read analysis for anyone interested in understanding charity and its influence on our lives and society.” Angela Eikenberry, University of Nebraska

“From charity humblebrags to performance philanthropy, this fascinating and highly-readable book provides many valuable insights for anyone interested in understanding the cultural and social role of charity.” Rhodri Davies, Charities Aid Foundation

 

Understanding Human Need
Hartley Dean, 2020
Bristol: Policy Press.
To order: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/understanding-human-need

Human need is a central but contested concept in social policy and the social sciences. This book provides an accessible overview of the subject using concepts from many disciplines. It presents a unique integrative model that shows how the main approaches may be reflected in social policy goals. The author engages with recent debates which advance our understanding of human need, including human wellbeing and 'happiness'; poverty, social exclusion and global inequality; human difference, the diversity of needs and the concept of human capabilities. Most crucially, the book explores how human needs may be translated into rights and how these can be informed by a politics of human need.  The book offers essential insights for students of social policy, but will also be of interest to other social science disciplines, policy makers and political activists.

 

The reputation of philanthropy since 1750 (Britain and beyond)
Hugh 
Cunninghan, 2020.
MBanchester: Manchester University Press.232 pages
To order: https://www.manchesterhive.com/view/9781526146397/9781526146397.xml

Most people now associate philanthropy with donations of money by the rich to good causes. It has not always been so. The Reputation of Philanthropy explores how our modern definition came about and asks why praise for philanthropy and philanthropists has always been matched by criticism. Were we really capable of loving all of humankind? Was it possible that what was thought of as philanthropy might create a dependency class and do more harm than good? Was it sensible to focus so much on far away places to the neglect of the poor at home? Deeply researched, timely and accessible, this book will inform today's thinking about the role that philanthropy should play in British society. The criticisms of philanthropy in the past have telling echoes in the present.

 

The rise of food charity in Europe
Edited by  , Edited by  

As the demand for food banks and other emergency food charities continues to rise across the continent, this is the first systematic Europe-wide study of the roots and consequences of this urgent phenomenon. Leading researchers provide case studies from the UK, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Slovenia and Spain, each considering the history and driving political and social forces behind the rise of food charity, and the influence of changing welfare states. They build into a rich comparative study that delivers valuable evidence for anyone with an academic or professional interest in related issues including social policy, exclusion, poverty and justice.

 

Multilevel democracy: how local institutions and civil society shape the modern state
J.M. Sellers, A, Lidström, Y, Bae (2020) 

Cambridge University Press
https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/multilevel-democracy/3BE7B1934C277928A604E175E45F8864

This volume presents the first systematic comparative analysis of national traditions of local democracy across the developed world, as well as their origins and evolution. It reveals how inclusive local institutions that integrate national and local governance make democracy work better. Across most of the developed world, early forms of the national state entrenched the local power of elites. In Anglo-American and Swiss democracies, state formation imposed enduring tensions with local civic governance. In contrast, inclusive, integrative local institutions in Northern Europe enabled close links with central government around common local and national agendas, producing better governance and fuller democracy to the present day. Through comparative analysis, the authors demonstrate how institutions for local governance and the participation of civil society differ widely among developed democracies, and how local democracy relates to national democracy. The resulting insights fundamentally recast our understanding of how to build and maintain more effective democracies.

 

Arts nonprofits: associations and agencies. A literature review
Robert Stebbins
2019. Brill
To order: https://brill.com/view/title/54526

An association is “a relatively formally structured nonprofit group that depends mainly on volunteer members for participation and activity and that primarily seeks member benefits, even if it may also seek some public benefits” (Smith, Stebbins, & Dover, 2006, p. 23). The arts that give birth to these organizations can be classified as either fine art or entertainment art. Every art association is embedded each in its own art world and its own social world. Members of these association are mostly amateurs or hobbyists in their art.

Publications on arts-related amateur, hobbyist, professional, and mixed-member associations are reviewed. Their prime mission is to foster, present, and sometimes chronicle the art that its members prize. Many of these works report on the structure of the associations as well as on the recruitment, artistic development, deployment of artists, dissemination of their art, and retention of their members. Also reviewed is a selection of publications bearing on what could be called “arts consumption clubs,” or groups such as book clubs, dance clubs, and jazz clubs established to generate interest in a given art. Some of the publications reviewed center on associational management, use of volunteers, and financial base of the group.


Handbook on Corporate Foundation
Editors: Roza, L., Bethmann, S., Meijs, L., von Schnurbein, G.
2020. Springer
303 pages. To order: https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030257583

Companies increasingly play a meaningful role in civil society and the philanthropic sector through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate Philanthropy (CP). The most well studied form of allocating these resources is through outright contributions to operating external foundations and other nonprofit organizations. However, far less is known about the use of corporate foundations, separate and independent nonprofit entities aimed at channeling corporate giving to a social mission related to a company. 

Corporate foundations are often linked to the founding company through their name, funding, trustees, administration and potential employee involvement. As these foundations are growing in number, size and importance and becoming increasingly visible in the philanthropic sector, the urgency to understand their role and functioning becomes more important.

The primary aim of this volume is to deliver a holistic analysis of the current state-of-the-art on corporate foundations. For that reason, the book includes different perspectives on and use a hybrid concept of corporate foundations. The book includes three main parts. First, looking further into the organizational processes of corporate foundations, the book analyzes governance and operations as major aspects of organizational performance. Second, it sheds light on the role of corporate foundations in various institutional settings. Lastly, the book includes various stakeholder perspectives on corporate foundations, including corporate employees, beneficiaries, and their non-profit partners.

  

A Place to Call Home: Women as Agents of Change in Mumbai
 
by Ramya Ramanath
2019. Routledge
170 pages.
To order: https://www.routledge.com/A-Place-to-Call-Home-Women-as-Agents-of-Change-in-Mumbai/Ramanath/p/book/9781138667341

 

Any city is a product of politics and economics, organizations and people. Yet, the life experiences of women uprooted from its poorest quarters seldom inform urban resettlement plans.

In this ethnographic field study, Ramya Ramanath, Associate Professor at DePaul University, examines the lives of women displaced by slum clearance and relocated to the largest slum resettlement site in Asia. Through conversations with diverse women of different ages, levels of education, types of employment, marital status, ethnicity, caste, religion, and household make-up, Ramanath recounts how women negotiate a drastic change in environment, from makeshift housing in a park slum to ownership of a high-rise apartment in a posh Mumbai suburb. Each phase of their city lives reflects how women initiate change and disseminate a vision valuable to planners intent on urban and residential transformations. Ramanath urges the concerted engagement of residents in design, development, and evaluation of place-making processes in cities and within their own neighborhoods especially.

This book will interest scholars of public policy, women and gender studies, South Asian studies, and urban planning.

 

 

Empathy beyond US borders: the challenges of transnational civic engagement
by Gary Adler, Jr.
2019. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
314 pages.
To order: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/empathy-beyond-us-borders/90EE6462C431D9BC2F687BE736988728

How do middle-class Americans become aware of distant social problems and act against them? US colleges, congregations, and seminaries increasingly promote immersion travel as a way to bridge global distance, produce empathy, and increase global awareness. But does it? Drawing from a mixed methods study of a progressive, religious immersion travel organization at the US-Mexico border, Empathy Beyond US Borders provides a broad sociological context for the rise of immersion travel as a form of transnational civic engagement. Gary J. Adler, Jr follows alongside immersion travelers as they meet undocumented immigrants, walk desert trails, and witness deportations. His close observations combine with interviews and surveys to evaluate the potential of this civic action, while developing theory about culture, empathy, and progressive religion in transnational civic life. This timely book describes the moralization of travel, the organizational challenges of transnational engagement, and the difficulty of feeling transformed but not knowing how to help.

 

Towards an institutional theory of community and community associations: a review.
by 
Carl Milofsky
Brill. 2019

To order: https://brill.com/view/title/54280?lang=en

This article argues the position that the symbolic sense of community is a product of action by associations and larger community-based organizations. It draws on a theory from urban sociology called “the community of limited liability.” In the past this theory, first articulated by Morris Janowitz, has mostly been used to argue that residents living in a local neighborhood feel a sense of identification with that area to the extent that the symbolism of that neighborhood has been developed. This article extends Janowitz’s theory to apply to local associations and their efforts to create activities, movements, and products that encourage residents to expand their sense of symbolic attachment to a place. We argue that this organizational method has long been used by local associations but it has not been recognized as an organizational theory. Because associations have used this approach over time, communities have a historical legacy of organizing and symbol creating efforts by many local associations. Over time they have competed, collaborated, and together developed a collective vision of place. They also have created a local interorganizational field and this field of interacting associations and organizations is dense with what we call associational social capital. Not all communities have this history of associational activity and associational social capital. Where it does exist, the field becomes an institutionalized feature of the community. This is what we mean by an institutional theory of community.

  

The Rebellion of the Everyday:
Community Philanthropy Meets Gender and Politics: Stories from Latin America

by Florencia Roitstein & Andrés Thompson

Inspired by the growing involvement and leadership of women in the field of philanthropy in the Global North, five years ago we started a research and action programme – ELLAS – Women and Philanthropy – to promote the participation of women in philanthropy in Latin America. After some research we realized that this growing involvement of women was, apparently, not the case in our region. Women at the top of our societies were not getting richer, were not becoming the new philanthropists, nor creating their own foundations. However, there was no doubt that women in general were playing a key role in expanding democracy, defending human and women’s rights, protecting the environment, and pursuing permanent peace and justice – in the most inequitable region of the world. Also given that philanthropy in the region is not driven by those at the “top” of society (even worse, those at the “top” are practically absent from the philanthropic sector), we were compelled to look at what was happening at the community level. Our hypothesis was that there was an invisible community philanthropy movement at the grassroots of society, mainly led by women that were sustaining and expanding democracy.

To learn more, please click here.

 

Civic engagement in Scandinavia: volunteering, informal help and giving in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

Co-edited by Lars Henriksen, Kristin Strømsnes, Lars Svedberg
Springer. 244 pages.

To order: https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319987163
 

coverSince the 1990’s, a number of studies have documented a remarkable high and stable amount of popular engagement in civic organizations in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Often these countries have been considered deviant cases against the proliferating decline of social capital studies.

However, despite great international interest in the Scandinavian region, the volume argues that the civil societies and the civic engagement of these countries remain poorly understood. Most interest in the Scandinavian welfare models addresses the balance between state and market, but under communicates the role played by civil society and popular engagement in associations and voluntary organizations.

The contributions offer a coherent portrait of stability and change in formal and informal forms of civic engagement over the past 25 years as well as offering contextualized knowledge of the history and institutional design in which Scandinavian civil societies are embedded.


Shared Space and the New Nonprofit Workplace

Co-authored by China Brotsky, Sarah M. Eisinger, Diane Vinokur-Kaplan                                   
Oxford Press, 2019.  476 pages. 
                                                To order; https://bit.ly/2TjQsB7 

While the economy has boomed since the Great Recession, so too have real estate rents and gentrification in cities across North America; many nonprofits, priced out of formerly affordable neighborhoods, lack adequate workplaces to meet their missions. Shared Space and the New Nonprofit Workplace presents a comprehensive overview of shared space as an innovative model and effective long-term solution for nonprofit organizations' need for stable and affordable office and program space. In particular, it focuses on co-locating multiple nonprofits in a shared space, often called a nonprofit center, which provides shared services and promotes a collaborative culture.

This comprehensive resource provides a practical road map to develop new workspaces; documents benefits for nonprofit staff and organizations, and for their communities; presents challenges and solutions from successful nonprofit shared spaces; and considers nonprofit centers' history, past research, and future trends. Further, it offers nonprofits an opportunity to engage in forward-thinking practices, such as collaborative service delivery, green building operations, and cross-sector alliances. The book will be useful to researchers and students of the nonprofit sector, nonprofit executives, staff and board members, foundations, philanthropists, and real estate and urban planning professionals interested in creating such projects.

  

Social Enterprise in Asia

Edited by Eric BidetJacques Defourny
2019: Routledge, 374 pages
Cost: 120 USD

To order: https://www.routledge.com/Social-Enterprise-in-Asia-Theory-Models-and-Practice-1st-Edition/Bidet-Defourny/p/book/9780367211592

 

In the absence of a widely accepted and common definition of social enterprise (SE), a large research project, the "International Comparative Social Enterprise Models" (ICSEM) Project, was carried out over a five-year period; it involved more than 200 researchers from 55 countries and relied on bottom-up approaches to capture the SE phenomenon. This strategy made it possible to take into account and give legitimacy to locally embedded approaches, thus resulting in an analysis encompassing a wide diversity of social enterprises, while simultaneously allowing for the identification of major SE models to delineate the field on common grounds at the international level. 

 

A Research Agenda for Social Entrepreneurship

Edited by Anne de Bruin, Massey University, New Zealand and Simon Teasdale, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
2019: Elgar Publishing
Cost: 122 USD
To order: https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/a-research-agenda-for-social-entrepreneurship 

In the last two decades social entrepreneurship has grown in energy and impact as entrepreneurial spirit has increasingly turned to finding solutions for social, cultural and environmental issues. As social entrepreneurship has grown in popularity, so too has its academic study. A Research Agenda for Social Entrepreneurship brings together contributions from developing paths in the field to signpost the directions ahead for the study of social entrepreneurship.

  

Understanding social enterprise: theory and practice
Ridley-Duff, R., Bull, M. 
London: Sage. 2019
512 Pages.

This updated edition of Understanding Social Enterprise comes packed with a wealth of learning features to help students understand the theory and practice within this ever expanding field.

Updates to this edition include:

  • New case studies and examples throughout
  • Considerations of new developments in policy, the economy and legal implications of social enterprise
  • A focus on the pathways that social enterprise follow

 

International Organizations and Global Civil Society: Histories of the Union of International Associations 

Edited by Daniel Laqua, Wouter Van Acker, Christophe Verbruggen
2019: New York. Bloomsbury. 280 pages.
Cost: 102 USD
To order: 
https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/international-organizations-and-global-civil-society-9781350055636/
 

The Union of International Associations (UIA) was founded in 1910, aiming to coordinate the relations and interests of international organizations across the world. Its long history makes it a prism through which to study the field of international organizations and its dynamics. 

Bringing together experts from fields including history, political science and international relations, architecture, historical sociology, digital humanities and information studies, International Organizations and Global Civil Society is the first scholarly book to cover both the UIA's early years and its more recent past. Key issues explored include the UIA's importance for the field of scientific internationalism, the relations between the UIA and other international organizations, and the changing position of the UIA when facing geopolitical challenges such as totalitarianism, the World Wars and the Cold War.

This important book addresses a number of current scholarly concerns: the concept of "global civil society"; the development of international relations as a field of study; the investigation of transnational factors in modern and contemporary history; and the tracing of forerunners to the "information society".

 

Becoming one: religion, development, and environmentalism in a Japanese NPO in Myanmar

by Chika Watanabe
2019: Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press. 256 Pages.  
Cost : 68.00 USD

To order: https://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/becoming-one-religion-development-and-environmentalism-in-a-japanese-ngo-in-myanmar/

At OISCA training centers, Japanese and local staff teach sustainable agricultural skills and organic farming methods to rural youth. Much of the teaching involves laboring in the fields, harvesting produce, and caring for livestock: what they can’t use themselves is sold at nearby markets. Watanabe’s detailed and multi-sited ethnography shows how Japanese and Burmese actors mobilize around the idea of “becoming one” with Mother Earth and their human counterparts within a shared communal lifestyle. By exploring the tension between intentions and political effects—spanning environmentalism, cultural-nationalist ideologies of “Japaneseness,” and aspirations to make the world a better place—Watanabe highlights fascinating questions and both positive and negative outcomes.

Becoming One weaves together vivid descriptions of the intensive, intimate, and “muddy labor” of “making persons” (hitozukuri) with the wider historical resonances of these efforts, decentering common understandings of development, NGOs, and their moral and political promises. This engaging and thought-provoking book combines insights from anthropology, development studies, and religious studies to add to our understanding of modern Japan.

 

International Organizations and Global Civil Society Histories of the Union of International Associations
Editor(s): Daniel Laqua, Wouter Van Acker, Christophe Verbruggen
Bloomsbury Academic. 280 Pages.
Cost: $82.00 USD
To order: www.bloomsbury.com

 

The Union of International Associations (UIA) was founded in 1910, aiming to coordinate the relations and interests of international organizations across the world. Its long history makes it a prism through which to study the field of international organizations and its dynamics. 

Bringing together experts from fields including history, political science and international relations, architecture, historical sociology, digital humanities and information studies, International Organizations and Global Civil Society is the first scholarly book to cover both the UIA's early years and its more recent past. Key issues explored include the UIA's importance for the field of scientific internationalism, the relations between the UIA and other international organizations, and the changing position of the UIA when facing geopolitical challenges such as totalitarianism, the World Wars and the Cold War.
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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